Aug 6, 2016

Monochrome Rome

The magical charm of Rome in black and white

The majestic Colosseum at night, one of the seven wonders of the world. This amazing elliptical amphi - theatre is the largest ever built in the Roman Empire and one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering. Capable of seating 50,000 spectators, it was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles. As well as the gladiatorial games, other public spectacles were held there, such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on classical mythology. The Colosseum ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era...



Trevi Fountain (Fontana di Trevi) is an 18th century extravaganza of baroque stonework ruled over by a large statue of Neptune. Visitors come here at night for 20 minutes or so to toss a coin into the fountain, which is said to ensure that you will some day return to Rome...



This amazing ancient monument was built and rebuilt several times, first by Agrippa who began it in 27 B.C. The presente structure is the result  of an early 2nd century A.D. reconstruction by the Emperor Hadrian. The Pantheon stands on Piazza della rotonda, which is complete with obelisk and baroque  fountain. It is in an astonishing state of preservation, considering nearly two millennia of vandalism...


St. Peter's Basilica is in Vatican City. It's the current church of the pope and one of the largest and most important Catholic churches in the world. Inside the vast interior, there's lots of marble, bronze and gold artwork, including Michelangelo's Pietà. Vatican is a landlocked sovereign city-state whose territory consists of a walled enclave within the city of Rome...



Night scenery of Piazza della Repubblica where there is the splendid Fountain of Naiads. Flanked by grand neoclassical colonnades, this landmark piazza was laid out as part of Rome's post-unification makeover. It follows the lines of the semicircular exedra (benched portico) of Diocletian's Baths complex and was originally known as Piazza Esedra. In the centre, this fountain aroused puritanical ire when it was unveiled by architect Mario Rutelli in 1901. The nudity of the four naiads or water nymphs, who surround the central figure of Glaucus wrestling a fish, was considered too provocative...

The Altare della Patria (in English"Altar of the Fatherland"), also known as the Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II ("National Monument to Victor Emmanuel II") or Il Vittoriano, is a monument built in honour of Victor Emmanuel, the first king of a unified Italy, located in Rome, Italy. It occupies a site between the Piazza Venezia and the Capitoline Hill. The eclectic structure was designed by Giuseppe Sacconi in 1885; sculpture for it was parceled out to established sculptors all over Italy, such as Leonardo Bistolfi and Angelo Zanelli. It was inaugurated in 1911 and completed in 1925...

The Spanish Steps (in Italian, Scalinata di Trinità dei Monti) are a set of steps in Rome, Italy, climbing a steep slope between the Piazza di Spagna at the base and Piazza Trinità dei Monti, dominated by the Trinità dei Monti church at the top. The monumental stairway of 135 steps (the slightly elevated drainage system is often mistaken for the first step) was built with French diplomat Étienne Gueffier’s bequeathed funds of 20,000 scudi, in 1723–1725, linking the Bourbon Spanish Embassy, and the Trinità dei Monti church that was under the patronage of the Bourbon kings of France, both located above — to the Holy See in Palazzo Monaldeschi located below. The stairway was designed by architects Francesco de Sanctis and Alessandro Specchi...

Piazza Barberini at night, a splendid square. Its name derives from the adjacent Palazzo Barberini (where there is the National Gallery of Ancient Art) and the homonymous ancient family who lived there. At the center, the wonderful Triton Fountain, artistic work by the famous Baroque artist, Bernini, created in 1643 for Pope Urban VIII. The sculptural group is composed of four dolphins who acrobatically sustain with their tails an enormous shell. The Triton blows on this shell through a sea snail shouting water...


The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as Castel Sant'Angelo, is a towering cylindrical building in Rome, initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used by the popes as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum. The Castel was once the tallest building in Rome...



The Terme di Diocleziano (Baths of Diocletian), built between 298 and 306 AD by the emperor Diocletian, were the largest and most sumptuous of the imperial baths in ancient Rome, an amazing monumental complex, unique in the world, both for its size and for its state of preservation. It is an iconic site for the thousands of years of Rome's history. They were transformed by Michelangelo into the Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli and the Carthusian Monastery, and subsequently the location of the Museum Nazionale Roman from its foundation in 1889. The visitor's route starts from the magnificent and imposing tenth hall (Aula Decima) of the Baths. Next one can visit three separate museums - the Epigraphic Museum, the Museum of Protohistory and the Virtual Museum of the Via Flaminia - and end up in Michelangelo's grand cloister, a surprising oasis of peace and quiet. More than 400 works of art - statues, reliefs, altars and sarcophagi - from different monuments in Rome are on display there...

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